Seattle Condo Blog Wars Heat Up

Ben’s got plenty of fighting words in his post, If You Can Beat’em, Play Dirty:

The condo blog has risen to become one of the top condo websites in Seattle – it’s #1 in Google’s organic search results for a myriad of condo related keywords and receives the most visitor traffic (per Compete, Alexa and Quantcast metrics) among Seattle-based condo blogs and websites. And, the exclusive partnership with King5.com is a testament to the blog’s reputation. Admittedly, it’s a nice position to be in.

Apparently “someone” was buying Google Adwords on his name. Too funny but not surprising given the downturn in the real estate market. Consumer leads are now more and more precious and I’m sure everyone is willing to do whatever it takes to win. Granted, buying Adwords on your competitors names isn’t an uncommon practice in search engine marketing.

…Maybe we should all just share Google Analytic passwords for a day to see who is really winning at Seattle condo blogging. Though thankfully blogging isn’t a zero sum game.

Meanwhile Scott Thompson of Weber Thompson joins the blogging fray with a blog about their new offices. Hopefully they blog about their condo projects one day.

About Matt

Matt , Urbnlivn's publisher, has a love for lofts, floating homes and mid-century moderns.

For years Matt resisted becoming a real estate agent preferring to be an executive in the startup world but he recently caved in the spring of 2014 and became an agent.

You can also find Matt on Twitter or skiing.

  • jo

    Drama. Awesome.

    I don’t see a problem with buying keywords in a competitors name; it’s done all the time. But labeling your blog in someone else’s name? That’s so out there I wonder if Google just defaults the ad title to the searched KW if the advertiser doesn’t specify a headline. I highly doubt that Wen…errr…the competiting blogger meant the ad to show with Ben’s name as the link.

  • jo

    Drama. Awesome.

    I don’t see a problem with buying keywords in a competitors name; it’s done all the time. But labeling your blog in someone else’s name? That’s so out there I wonder if Google just defaults the ad title to the searched KW if the advertiser doesn’t specify a headline. I highly doubt that Wen…errr…the competiting blogger meant the ad to show with Ben’s name as the link.

  • http://seattlebubble.com/ The Tim

    Heh. It seems there’s a lot of charged emotions running around on the local RE blogs of all flavors lately.

    I find it quite amusing that people use Compete, Alexa and Quantcast as some sort of authoritative measure of popularity. All three have been miserably off base for most websites I’ve ever tried to compare.

  • http://seattlebubble.com/ The Tim

    Heh. It seems there’s a lot of charged emotions running around on the local RE blogs of all flavors lately.

    I find it quite amusing that people use Compete, Alexa and Quantcast as some sort of authoritative measure of popularity. All three have been miserably off base for most websites I’ve ever tried to compare.

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I just looked up Redfin and all three are horribly inaccurate compared to our actual traffic numbers in Google Analytics.

    I certainly wouldn’t trust them for sites which receive much less traffic.

  • http://blog.mattgoyer.com Matt

    I just looked up Redfin and all three are horribly inaccurate compared to our actual traffic numbers in Google Analytics.

    I certainly wouldn’t trust them for sites which receive much less traffic.

  • Ben K

    Yeah, they’re not the best, but it’s really all that’s available to compare sites. Though, I wasn’t comparing actual traffic numbers, but rather looking at where blogs stand relative to each other. The real metric sites probably don’t even know our tiny blogs exist.

    It’s all pretty amusing actually.

  • Ben K

    Yeah, they’re not the best, but it’s really all that’s available to compare sites. Though, I wasn’t comparing actual traffic numbers, but rather looking at where blogs stand relative to each other. The real metric sites probably don’t even know our tiny blogs exist.

    It’s all pretty amusing actually.

  • Greg

    This is silly season. From the screen shot, it looks like the Adwords campaign put the search term in the ad creative dynamically. Buying competitor keywords and using dynamic keyword insertion is PPC 101.

  • Greg

    This is silly season. From the screen shot, it looks like the Adwords campaign put the search term in the ad creative dynamically. Buying competitor keywords and using dynamic keyword insertion is PPC 101.

  • Dalai Lama

    Wow. I just read Ben’s post. Not sure which is worse, using a blog post to libel someone or buying keywords on your competition. I didn’t follow all the conspiracy theories but seemed a bit harsh to me.

  • Dalai Lama

    Wow. I just read Ben’s post. Not sure which is worse, using a blog post to libel someone or buying keywords on your competition. I didn’t follow all the conspiracy theories but seemed a bit harsh to me.

  • http://www.SeattleCondoReview.com Wendy Leung

    This is Wendy here. First of all, I want to say Ben has a great blog. Secondly, as soon as he contacted my branch office earlier this week, I immediately talked to my webmaster, had the problem fixed, and apologized to Ben the same day. As many of you know, my specialty is helping people buy/sell condos and writing condo reviews ;-) I’m not an expert in html or Google ads so I rely on my webmaster (who’s also my husband) to deal with all the computer programming.

    Anyhow, he looked into it right away and found that Ben’s name was indeed a keyword (one of over a thousand) in my Google ads campaign. Almost all of my campaign keywords are generated through a computer program which periodically crawls the web for keywords related to Seattle condos. I asked that Ben’s name be removed immediately and it was pulled within minutes. As for the ad itself, I learned many of my ads use a feature which pulls the exact search words entered into Google and displays them as the headline of the ad.

    In summary, the ad was definitely not intentional; as soon as I heard, I confirmed the problem and had it fixed; and I personally explained and apologized to Ben the same day. I would never intentionally do this to anybody and again, apologize to Ben for the misunderstanding.

  • http://www.SeattleCondoReview.com Wendy Leung

    This is Wendy here. First of all, I want to say Ben has a great blog. Secondly, as soon as he contacted my branch office earlier this week, I immediately talked to my webmaster, had the problem fixed, and apologized to Ben the same day. As many of you know, my specialty is helping people buy/sell condos and writing condo reviews ;-) I’m not an expert in html or Google ads so I rely on my webmaster (who’s also my husband) to deal with all the computer programming.

    Anyhow, he looked into it right away and found that Ben’s name was indeed a keyword (one of over a thousand) in my Google ads campaign. Almost all of my campaign keywords are generated through a computer program which periodically crawls the web for keywords related to Seattle condos. I asked that Ben’s name be removed immediately and it was pulled within minutes. As for the ad itself, I learned many of my ads use a feature which pulls the exact search words entered into Google and displays them as the headline of the ad.

    In summary, the ad was definitely not intentional; as soon as I heard, I confirmed the problem and had it fixed; and I personally explained and apologized to Ben the same day. I would never intentionally do this to anybody and again, apologize to Ben for the misunderstanding.

  • PistolPete

    Hey Ben,

    Wendy says she’s sorry :P hahahaha

  • PistolPete

    Hey Ben,

    Wendy says she’s sorry :P hahahaha

  • newbuyer

    Wendy, I completely believe you and people should chill. Stop being so competitive. . .

  • newbuyer

    Wendy, I completely believe you and people should chill. Stop being so competitive. . .