Reserve Studies to Be Required

This weekend the Seattle Times reports that New state law requires condo associations to report money set aside for long-term maintenance:

Calling it the “biggest thing to happen since the Condominium Act of 1990 was passed,” longtime condo attorney Kris Sundberg says the new provisions will address “the dirty little secret of the condo world: Most condos are severely underfunded.”

I’m sure we all have stories of a friend in an older building hit by a large assessment. Likely more will be hit as they do the required reserve study and address their inadequacies but this law will making things rocky initially will condo associations on the correct path for the future.

The article also has a sidebar on how to get more info:

The Washington State Chapter of the Community Associations Institute is sponsoring a seminar about the new reserve-study requirement and its implications for homeowners associations on Saturday, May 17, 9 a.m.-noon, Shoreline Conference Center, 18560 First Ave. N.E. Registration fee varies. Information: www.wscai.org or 425-778-6378. The institute also has a list of reserve-study specialists on its Web site.

About Matt Goyer

I love condos, lofts, floating homes, new construction and mid-century moderns so much so that since starting this blog in 2006 I've written over 2,000 blog posts about them!

For years I resisted becoming a real estate agent preferring to be a marketing executive at Redfin but after leaving Redfin (after seven years!) I caved in the spring of 2014 and became a broker. So if you need help finding that "Urbnlivn-style" place or selling your home email me at matt@urbnlivn.com, I'd be happy to help you.

Prior to Urbnlivn and Redfin, I worked at Microsoft after graduating from the University of Waterloo with a Bachelor of Mathematics with a major in computer science.

You can also find me on Twitter, @MattGoyer, or LinkedIn.

  • Sophia

    The way the act is presently arranged may cause some problems as well as some plusses. The calculation for being “fully funded” is pretty arcane, and the probable jump in condo dues will spur a number of buyers into avoiding condos and heading for zero lot based units. Condos will lose capital value as a result. Having said that, I do agree that many associations are underfunded.

  • Sophia

    The way the act is presently arranged may cause some problems as well as some plusses. The calculation for being “fully funded” is pretty arcane, and the probable jump in condo dues will spur a number of buyers into avoiding condos and heading for zero lot based units. Condos will lose capital value as a result. Having said that, I do agree that many associations are underfunded.