Olive 8 Interiors!

I got a peak at the Olive 8 interiors tonight, completely missing my Meritage annual meeting. Whoops! (Thanks to the Urbnlivn reader who tipped me off to the broker’s open tonight.)

503142466 JrnPM S Olive 8 Interiors!

Olive8 is currently 85% sold with closings happening now and move-ins starting in a week. With the market being what is you can expect a significant number of units to come back on the market as many folks who bought a year or two ago will now be unable to close. I hear many of those folks are real estate agents. I don’t have numbers supporting it but I’d wager that Olive8 had more real estate agents buy here than any other recent building.

I showed up late so I didn’t get to spend enough time checking things out. I’ll see about heading back this weekend to give you all a better write up. Or better yet, you head there this weekend since they’ll be open for the first time and report back! They have 3 staged units with more on the way. Note that the lobby furniture is temporary and it’s missing the proper art.

Here’s me waiting for the elevator at Trace on my way home. I am tired.

503179076 wH8Um S Olive 8 Interiors!

About Matt

Matt , Urbnlivn's publisher, has a love for lofts, floating homes and mid-century moderns.

For years Matt resisted becoming a real estate agent preferring to be an executive in the startup world but he recently caved in the spring of 2014 and became an agent.

You can also find Matt on Twitter or skiing.

  • Yo

    I reserved at Olive 8 a couple years ago and don't plan to close.

    What really bothers me is that all the lower level units were sold to buddies of the Williams Marketing folk who were planning on flipping. These were supposedly done by “lottery” which actually turned out to be a bunch of their friends/coworkers/agents. Honest to goodness buyers had a tough time getting in on the initial offering.

    Sad thing that is if these units were sold to actual homeowners, not investors planning to flip, the building would have a good chance of success. Instead there's going to be a massive drop out of the lower level floors which will cascade fear up floors to the “real” buyers.

    Part of me is saddened by what's going to happen there, but the other part of me thinks the developer and Williams Marketing brought this on themselves by letting their buddies reserve early. It's a strategy that is going to completely back-fire and cause a large number of people who were planning on closing to otherwise drop out.

    I'd wager that 50% of the initial reservations actually close in the end, leaving the building at 35-40% sold.

    Sad times.

  • Yo

    I reserved at Olive 8 a couple years ago and don't plan to close.

    What really bothers me is that all the lower level units were sold to buddies of the Williams Marketing folk who were planning on flipping. These were supposedly done by “lottery” which actually turned out to be a bunch of their friends/coworkers/agents. Honest to goodness buyers had a tough time getting in on the initial offering.

    Sad thing that is if these units were sold to actual homeowners, not investors planning to flip, the building would have a good chance of success. Instead there's going to be a massive drop out of the lower level floors which will cascade fear up floors to the “real” buyers.

    Part of me is saddened by what's going to happen there, but the other part of me thinks the developer and Williams Marketing brought this on themselves by letting their buddies reserve early. It's a strategy that is going to completely back-fire and cause a large number of people who were planning on closing to otherwise drop out.

    I'd wager that 50% of the initial reservations actually close in the end, leaving the building at 35-40% sold.

    Sad times.

  • Yo

    I reserved at Olive 8 a couple years ago and don't plan to close.

    What really bothers me is that all the lower level units were sold to buddies of the Williams Marketing folk who were planning on flipping. These were supposedly done by “lottery” which actually turned out to be a bunch of their friends/coworkers/agents. Honest to goodness buyers had a tough time getting in on the initial offering.

    Sad thing that is if these units were sold to actual homeowners, not investors planning to flip, the building would have a good chance of success. Instead there's going to be a massive drop out of the lower level floors which will cascade fear up floors to the “real” buyers.

    Part of me is saddened by what's going to happen there, but the other part of me thinks the developer and Williams Marketing brought this on themselves by letting their buddies reserve early. It's a strategy that is going to completely back-fire and cause a large number of people who were planning on closing to otherwise drop out.

    I'd wager that 50% of the initial reservations actually close in the end, leaving the building at 35-40% sold.

    Sad times.

  • Yo

    I reserved at Olive 8 a couple years ago and don't plan to close.

    What really bothers me is that all the lower level units were sold to buddies of the Williams Marketing folk who were planning on flipping. These were supposedly done by “lottery” which actually turned out to be a bunch of their friends/coworkers/agents. Honest to goodness buyers had a tough time getting in on the initial offering.

    Sad thing that is if these units were sold to actual homeowners, not investors planning to flip, the building would have a good chance of success. Instead there's going to be a massive drop out of the lower level floors which will cascade fear up floors to the “real” buyers.

    Part of me is saddened by what's going to happen there, but the other part of me thinks the developer and Williams Marketing brought this on themselves by letting their buddies reserve early. It's a strategy that is going to completely back-fire and cause a large number of people who were planning on closing to otherwise drop out.

    I'd wager that 50% of the initial reservations actually close in the end, leaving the building at 35-40% sold.

    Sad times.

  • Yo

    I reserved at Olive 8 a couple years ago and don't plan to close.

    What really bothers me is that all the lower level units were sold to buddies of the Williams Marketing folk who were planning on flipping. These were supposedly done by “lottery” which actually turned out to be a bunch of their friends/coworkers/agents. Honest to goodness buyers had a tough time getting in on the initial offering.

    Sad thing that is if these units were sold to actual homeowners, not investors planning to flip, the building would have a good chance of success. Instead there's going to be a massive drop out of the lower level floors which will cascade fear up floors to the “real” buyers.

    Part of me is saddened by what's going to happen there, but the other part of me thinks the developer and Williams Marketing brought this on themselves by letting their buddies reserve early. It's a strategy that is going to completely back-fire and cause a large number of people who were planning on closing to otherwise drop out.

    I'd wager that 50% of the initial reservations actually close in the end, leaving the building at 35-40% sold.

    Sad times.

  • Yo

    I reserved at Olive 8 a couple years ago and don't plan to close.

    What really bothers me is that all the lower level units were sold to buddies of the Williams Marketing folk who were planning on flipping. These were supposedly done by “lottery” which actually turned out to be a bunch of their friends/coworkers/agents. Honest to goodness buyers had a tough time getting in on the initial offering.

    Sad thing that is if these units were sold to actual homeowners, not investors planning to flip, the building would have a good chance of success. Instead there's going to be a massive drop out of the lower level floors which will cascade fear up floors to the “real” buyers.

    Part of me is saddened by what's going to happen there, but the other part of me thinks the developer and Williams Marketing brought this on themselves by letting their buddies reserve early. It's a strategy that is going to completely back-fire and cause a large number of people who were planning on closing to otherwise drop out.

    I'd wager that 50% of the initial reservations actually close in the end, leaving the building at 35-40% sold.

    Sad times.

  • Yo

    I reserved at Olive 8 a couple years ago and don't plan to close.

    What really bothers me is that all the lower level units were sold to buddies of the Williams Marketing folk who were planning on flipping. These were supposedly done by “lottery” which actually turned out to be a bunch of their friends/coworkers/agents. Honest to goodness buyers had a tough time getting in on the initial offering.

    Sad thing that is if these units were sold to actual homeowners, not investors planning to flip, the building would have a good chance of success. Instead there's going to be a massive drop out of the lower level floors which will cascade fear up floors to the “real” buyers.

    Part of me is saddened by what's going to happen there, but the other part of me thinks the developer and Williams Marketing brought this on themselves by letting their buddies reserve early. It's a strategy that is going to completely back-fire and cause a large number of people who were planning on closing to otherwise drop out.

    I'd wager that 50% of the initial reservations actually close in the end, leaving the building at 35-40% sold.

    Sad times.

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I totally agree. I actually said to someone there tonight that I would guess that they'd only close 50% of the 85%.

    Why aren't you planning to close? Are you walking away from your 5% earnest money?

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I totally agree. I actually said to someone there tonight that I would guess that they'd only close 50% of the 85%.

    Why aren't you planning to close? Are you walking away from your 5% earnest money?

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I totally agree. I actually said to someone there tonight that I would guess that they'd only close 50% of the 85%.

    Why aren't you planning to close? Are you walking away from your 5% earnest money?

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I totally agree. I actually said to someone there tonight that I would guess that they'd only close 50% of the 85%.

    Why aren't you planning to close? Are you walking away from your 5% earnest money?

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I totally agree. I actually said to someone there tonight that I would guess that they'd only close 50% of the 85%.

    Why aren't you planning to close? Are you walking away from your 5% earnest money?

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I totally agree. I actually said to someone there tonight that I would guess that they'd only close 50% of the 85%.

    Why aren't you planning to close? Are you walking away from your 5% earnest money?

  • http://twitter.com/mattgoyer mattgoyer

    I totally agree. I actually said to someone there tonight that I would guess that they'd only close 50% of the 85%.

    Why aren't you planning to close? Are you walking away from your 5% earnest money?

  • ArtFan

    There is a blog for Oliver8 buyers at http://olive8.blogspot.com

  • ArtFan

    There is a blog for Oliver8 buyers at http://olive8.blogspot.com

  • ArtFan

    There is a blog for Oliver8 buyers at http://olive8.blogspot.com

  • ArtFan

    There is a blog for Oliver8 buyers at http://olive8.blogspot.com

  • ArtFan

    There is a blog for Oliver8 buyers at http://olive8.blogspot.com

  • ArtFan

    There is a blog for Oliver8 buyers at http://olive8.blogspot.com

  • ArtFan

    There is a blog for Oliver8 buyers at http://olive8.blogspot.com

  • Yo

    I'm not planning on closing due to the following:

    1. Concerns about unsold inventory. Olive 8 is a higher level building with a higher price tag which I believe will have a tough time moving the remaining inventory over the upcoming years. Are there really people out there who are willing to pay 500-800k for a sub 700 square foot condo? Not in my opinion. My guess is that the remaining units will either go the way of: auction, apartments, and/or price reductions. None of which bode well for current buyers. Am I willing to bet prices will drop greater than 5% (my earnest money) of the price I'm locked in at? In my case – yes.

    2. Changes in the financing climate. It's harder to purchase a condo in comparison to a house, and with this building possibility becoming a high number of rentals, it's going to be even tougher for resales. We're starting to see this with Williams Marketing already renting out units. I'm absolutely shocked to see that clist ad with the WM logo plastered on it advertising a rental. Lower amounts of rentals makes the building more appealing and also easier to finance. Why the company marketing the building is also playing renter just seems like they're shooting themselves in the foot. Not a way to inspire confidence in those planning to close.

    3. How investor laden the first half of the building is. Those of who reserved planning to make Olive 8 our primary residence are really getting the shaft here. I feel like I fell sucker to a classic pump and dump. When I signed a great number of the units were already reserved. Little did I know that a lot of those reservations were investors or actual real estate agents. Had I known I may have made a different decision. No one to blame but myself on this one.

    4. Finished quality. Not impressed one bit. I think they've really dropped the ball on this one. From the units not measuring up to the original square footage to the touch and feel of the unit, it just didn't give me that “wow” feeling I was expecting to have. Think of it as expecting a Lexus and instead receiving a Toyota. I don't think I'm the only one that feels this way – looking at the number of units showing up on craigslist one can see that the number has multiplied since the open house. IMO the developer was in a rush to get them done and cut corners in order to make it happen. I could be wrong though.

    To me it's a perfect storm. If unsold inventory wasn't a concern I may be willing to overlook the finished quality, if finished quality was what I was expecting I might overlook the concern about unsold inventory, ect. But it's really a combination of all four that made my decision not to close a concrete one. The fact the developer has been absolutely silent throughout this entire process has cemented that decision.

    Why I would consider closing:

    1. No HOD's in the forseeable future. A building must be 70% closed to start collecting HOD's. Chance are this 70% mark won't be hit for a couple years.

    2. Already got my 5% in. If I could buy the unit without taking any more money out of my pocket I probably would and just rent out the thing for the next ten years.

    3. If I was in for the long term I'd close. Five years won't be viable, ten years yes.

    4. The pool area/gym is cool.

    It really stinks to walk away from that 5%. But I've been without it the last couple years and while it would be nice to have it back (hello new car!), missing that 5% won't affect my life at all. I could sit here and think to myself what I should have done differently but that won't change things one bit. Reading the news daily about the hardships others are going through pales in comparison to the 30some thousand I'll stand to forfeit. Heck, I have a decent job, good health, and close family. What else could one ask for. :)

  • Yo

    I'm not planning on closing due to the following:

    1. Concerns about unsold inventory. Olive 8 is a higher level building with a higher price tag which I believe will have a tough time moving the remaining inventory over the upcoming years. Are there really people out there who are willing to pay 500-800k for a sub 700 square foot condo? Not in my opinion. My guess is that the remaining units will either go the way of: auction, apartments, and/or price reductions. None of which bode well for current buyers. Am I willing to bet prices will drop greater than 5% (my earnest money) of the price I'm locked in at? In my case – yes.

    2. Changes in the financing climate. It's harder to purchase a condo in comparison to a house, and with this building possibility becoming a high number of rentals, it's going to be even tougher for resales. We're starting to see this with Williams Marketing already renting out units. I'm absolutely shocked to see that clist ad with the WM logo plastered on it advertising a rental. Lower amounts of rentals makes the building more appealing and also easier to finance. Why the company marketing the building is also playing renter just seems like they're shooting themselves in the foot. Not a way to inspire confidence in those planning to close.

    3. How investor laden the first half of the building is. Those of who reserved planning to make Olive 8 our primary residence are really getting the shaft here. I feel like I fell sucker to a classic pump and dump. When I signed a great number of the units were already reserved. Little did I know that a lot of those reservations were investors or actual real estate agents. Had I known I may have made a different decision. No one to blame but myself on this one.

    4. Finished quality. Not impressed one bit. I think they've really dropped the ball on this one. From the units not measuring up to the original square footage to the touch and feel of the unit, it just didn't give me that “wow” feeling I was expecting to have. Think of it as expecting a Lexus and instead receiving a Toyota. I don't think I'm the only one that feels this way – looking at the number of units showing up on craigslist one can see that the number has multiplied since the open house. IMO the developer was in a rush to get them done and cut corners in order to make it happen. I could be wrong though.

    To me it's a perfect storm. If unsold inventory wasn't a concern I may be willing to overlook the finished quality, if finished quality was what I was expecting I might overlook the concern about unsold inventory, ect. But it's really a combination of all four that made my decision not to close a concrete one. The fact the developer has been absolutely silent throughout this entire process has cemented that decision.

    Why I would consider closing:

    1. No HOD's in the forseeable future. A building must be 70% closed to start collecting HOD's. Chance are this 70% mark won't be hit for a couple years.

    2. Already got my 5% in. If I could buy the unit without taking any more money out of my pocket I probably would and just rent out the thing for the next ten years.

    3. If I was in for the long term I'd close. Five years won't be viable, ten years yes.

    4. The pool area/gym is cool.

    It really stinks to walk away from that 5%. But I've been without it the last couple years and while it would be nice to have it back (hello new car!), missing that 5% won't affect my life at all. I could sit here and think to myself what I should have done differently but that won't change things one bit. Reading the news daily about the hardships others are going through pales in comparison to the 30some thousand I'll stand to forfeit. Heck, I have a decent job, good health, and close family. What else could one ask for. :)

  • Yo

    I'm not planning on closing due to the following:

    1. Concerns about unsold inventory. Olive 8 is a higher level building with a higher price tag which I believe will have a tough time moving the remaining inventory over the upcoming years. Are there really people out there who are willing to pay 500-800k for a sub 700 square foot condo? Not in my opinion. My guess is that the remaining units will either go the way of: auction, apartments, and/or price reductions. None of which bode well for current buyers. Am I willing to bet prices will drop greater than 5% (my earnest money) of the price I'm locked in at? In my case – yes.

    2. Changes in the financing climate. It's harder to purchase a condo in comparison to a house, and with this building possibility becoming a high number of rentals, it's going to be even tougher for resales. We're starting to see this with Williams Marketing already renting out units. I'm absolutely shocked to see that clist ad with the WM logo plastered on it advertising a rental. Lower amounts of rentals makes the building more appealing and also easier to finance. Why the company marketing the building is also playing renter just seems like they're shooting themselves in the foot. Not a way to inspire confidence in those planning to close.

    3. How investor laden the first half of the building is. Those of who reserved planning to make Olive 8 our primary residence are really getting the shaft here. I feel like I fell sucker to a classic pump and dump. When I signed a great number of the units were already reserved. Little did I know that a lot of those reservations were investors or actual real estate agents. Had I known I may have made a different decision. No one to blame but myself on this one.

    4. Finished quality. Not impressed one bit. I think they've really dropped the ball on this one. From the units not measuring up to the original square footage to the touch and feel of the unit, it just didn't give me that “wow” feeling I was expecting to have. Think of it as expecting a Lexus and instead receiving a Toyota. I don't think I'm the only one that feels this way – looking at the number of units showing up on craigslist one can see that the number has multiplied since the open house. IMO the developer was in a rush to get them done and cut corners in order to make it happen. I could be wrong though.

    To me it's a perfect storm. If unsold inventory wasn't a concern I may be willing to overlook the finished quality, if finished quality was what I was expecting I might overlook the concern about unsold inventory, ect. But it's really a combination of all four that made my decision not to close a concrete one. The fact the developer has been absolutely silent throughout this entire process has cemented that decision.

    Why I would consider closing:

    1. No HOD's in the forseeable future. A building must be 70% closed to start collecting HOD's. Chance are this 70% mark won't be hit for a couple years.

    2. Already got my 5% in. If I could buy the unit without taking any more money out of my pocket I probably would and just rent out the thing for the next ten years.

    3. If I was in for the long term I'd close. Five years won't be viable, ten years yes.

    4. The pool area/gym is cool.

    It really stinks to walk away from that 5%. But I've been without it the last couple years and while it would be nice to have it back (hello new car!), missing that 5% won't affect my life at all. I could sit here and think to myself what I should have done differently but that won't change things one bit. Reading the news daily about the hardships others are going through pales in comparison to the 30some thousand I'll stand to forfeit. Heck, I have a decent job, good health, and close family. What else could one ask for. :)

  • Yo

    I'm not planning on closing due to the following:

    1. Concerns about unsold inventory. Olive 8 is a higher level building with a higher price tag which I believe will have a tough time moving the remaining inventory over the upcoming years. Are there really people out there who are willing to pay 500-800k for a sub 700 square foot condo? Not in my opinion. My guess is that the remaining units will either go the way of: auction, apartments, and/or price reductions. None of which bode well for current buyers. Am I willing to bet prices will drop greater than 5% (my earnest money) of the price I'm locked in at? In my case – yes.

    2. Changes in the financing climate. It's harder to purchase a condo in comparison to a house, and with this building possibility becoming a high number of rentals, it's going to be even tougher for resales. We're starting to see this with Williams Marketing already renting out units. I'm absolutely shocked to see that clist ad with the WM logo plastered on it advertising a rental. Lower amounts of rentals makes the building more appealing and also easier to finance. Why the company marketing the building is also playing renter just seems like they're shooting themselves in the foot. Not a way to inspire confidence in those planning to close.

    3. How investor laden the first half of the building is. Those of who reserved planning to make Olive 8 our primary residence are really getting the shaft here. I feel like I fell sucker to a classic pump and dump. When I signed a great number of the units were already reserved. Little did I know that a lot of those reservations were investors or actual real estate agents. Had I known I may have made a different decision. No one to blame but myself on this one.

    4. Finished quality. Not impressed one bit. I think they've really dropped the ball on this one. From the units not measuring up to the original square footage to the touch and feel of the unit, it just didn't give me that “wow” feeling I was expecting to have. Think of it as expecting a Lexus and instead receiving a Toyota. I don't think I'm the only one that feels this way – looking at the number of units showing up on craigslist one can see that the number has multiplied since the open house. IMO the developer was in a rush to get them done and cut corners in order to make it happen. I could be wrong though.

    To me it's a perfect storm. If unsold inventory wasn't a concern I may be willing to overlook the finished quality, if finished quality was what I was expecting I might overlook the concern about unsold inventory, ect. But it's really a combination of all four that made my decision not to close a concrete one. The fact the developer has been absolutely silent throughout this entire process has cemented that decision.

    Why I would consider closing:

    1. No HOD's in the forseeable future. A building must be 70% closed to start collecting HOD's. Chance are this 70% mark won't be hit for a couple years.

    2. Already got my 5% in. If I could buy the unit without taking any more money out of my pocket I probably would and just rent out the thing for the next ten years.

    3. If I was in for the long term I'd close. Five years won't be viable, ten years yes.

    4. The pool area/gym is cool.

    It really stinks to walk away from that 5%. But I've been without it the last couple years and while it would be nice to have it back (hello new car!), missing that 5% won't affect my life at all. I could sit here and think to myself what I should have done differently but that won't change things one bit. Reading the news daily about the hardships others are going through pales in comparison to the 30some thousand I'll stand to forfeit. Heck, I have a decent job, good health, and close family. What else could one ask for. :)

  • Yo

    I'm not planning on closing due to the following:

    1. Concerns about unsold inventory. Olive 8 is a higher level building with a higher price tag which I believe will have a tough time moving the remaining inventory over the upcoming years. Are there really people out there who are willing to pay 500-800k for a sub 700 square foot condo? Not in my opinion. My guess is that the remaining units will either go the way of: auction, apartments, and/or price reductions. None of which bode well for current buyers. Am I willing to bet prices will drop greater than 5% (my earnest money) of the price I'm locked in at? In my case – yes.

    2. Changes in the financing climate. It's harder to purchase a condo in comparison to a house, and with this building possibility becoming a high number of rentals, it's going to be even tougher for resales. We're starting to see this with Williams Marketing already renting out units. I'm absolutely shocked to see that clist ad with the WM logo plastered on it advertising a rental. Lower amounts of rentals makes the building more appealing and also easier to finance. Why the company marketing the building is also playing renter just seems like they're shooting themselves in the foot. Not a way to inspire confidence in those planning to close.

    3. How investor laden the first half of the building is. Those of who reserved planning to make Olive 8 our primary residence are really getting the shaft here. I feel like I fell sucker to a classic pump and dump. When I signed a great number of the units were already reserved. Little did I know that a lot of those reservations were investors or actual real estate agents. Had I known I may have made a different decision. No one to blame but myself on this one.

    4. Finished quality. Not impressed one bit. I think they've really dropped the ball on this one. From the units not measuring up to the original square footage to the touch and feel of the unit, it just didn't give me that “wow” feeling I was expecting to have. Think of it as expecting a Lexus and instead receiving a Toyota. I don't think I'm the only one that feels this way – looking at the number of units showing up on craigslist one can see that the number has multiplied since the open house. IMO the developer was in a rush to get them done and cut corners in order to make it happen. I could be wrong though.

    To me it's a perfect storm. If unsold inventory wasn't a concern I may be willing to overlook the finished quality, if finished quality was what I was expecting I might overlook the concern about unsold inventory, ect. But it's really a combination of all four that made my decision not to close a concrete one. The fact the developer has been absolutely silent throughout this entire process has cemented that decision.

    Why I would consider closing:

    1. No HOD's in the forseeable future. A building must be 70% closed to start collecting HOD's. Chance are this 70% mark won't be hit for a couple years.

    2. Already got my 5% in. If I could buy the unit without taking any more money out of my pocket I probably would and just rent out the thing for the next ten years.

    3. If I was in for the long term I'd close. Five years won't be viable, ten years yes.

    4. The pool area/gym is cool.

    It really stinks to walk away from that 5%. But I've been without it the last couple years and while it would be nice to have it back (hello new car!), missing that 5% won't affect my life at all. I could sit here and think to myself what I should have done differently but that won't change things one bit. Reading the news daily about the hardships others are going through pales in comparison to the 30some thousand I'll stand to forfeit. Heck, I have a decent job, good health, and close family. What else could one ask for. :)

  • o8

    What an enlightening, honest, and concise post. Thank you for sharing with us… although it is kind of a bummer story to tell. Wish you the best, and keep us posted.

  • o8

    What an enlightening, honest, and concise post. Thank you for sharing with us… although it is kind of a bummer story to tell. Wish you the best, and keep us posted.

  • o8

    What an enlightening, honest, and concise post. Thank you for sharing with us… although it is kind of a bummer story to tell. Wish you the best, and keep us posted.

  • o8

    What an enlightening, honest, and concise post. Thank you for sharing with us… although it is kind of a bummer story to tell. Wish you the best, and keep us posted.

  • o8

    What an enlightening, honest, and concise post. Thank you for sharing with us… although it is kind of a bummer story to tell. Wish you the best, and keep us posted.

  • CameronRex

    Yo, I'm sorry. Very disappointing for you but I find your outlook on life inspiring.

    From Matt's pictures the interiors look like a major disappointment. Layout is standard, nothing special. You could pay a few hundred thousand less at several buildings around town and add the same finishing and come out way ahead. I was expecting to be wowed by the pics and then just stared because I could not believe units this expensive could be finished this poorly.

  • CameronRex

    Yo, I'm sorry. Very disappointing for you but I find your outlook on life inspiring.

    From Matt's pictures the interiors look like a major disappointment. Layout is standard, nothing special. You could pay a few hundred thousand less at several buildings around town and add the same finishing and come out way ahead. I was expecting to be wowed by the pics and then just stared because I could not believe units this expensive could be finished this poorly.

  • CameronRex

    Yo, I'm sorry. Very disappointing for you but I find your outlook on life inspiring.

    From Matt's pictures the interiors look like a major disappointment. Layout is standard, nothing special. You could pay a few hundred thousand less at several buildings around town and add the same finishing and come out way ahead. I was expecting to be wowed by the pics and then just stared because I could not believe units this expensive could be finished this poorly.

  • CameronRex

    Yo, I'm sorry. Very disappointing for you but I find your outlook on life inspiring.

    From Matt's pictures the interiors look like a major disappointment. Layout is standard, nothing special. You could pay a few hundred thousand less at several buildings around town and add the same finishing and come out way ahead. I was expecting to be wowed by the pics and then just stared because I could not believe units this expensive could be finished this poorly.

  • CameronRex

    Yo, I'm sorry. Very disappointing for you but I find your outlook on life inspiring.

    From Matt's pictures the interiors look like a major disappointment. Layout is standard, nothing special. You could pay a few hundred thousand less at several buildings around town and add the same finishing and come out way ahead. I was expecting to be wowed by the pics and then just stared because I could not believe units this expensive could be finished this poorly.

  • CameronRex

    Yo, I'm sorry. Very disappointing for you but I find your outlook on life inspiring.

    From Matt's pictures the interiors look like a major disappointment. Layout is standard, nothing special. You could pay a few hundred thousand less at several buildings around town and add the same finishing and come out way ahead. I was expecting to be wowed by the pics and then just stared because I could not believe units this expensive could be finished this poorly.

  • Poloboy311

    Im wondering if anyone gots these for lease now and if so where do i find one. Bc im moving up here in dec/first week of jan and wanted to live there….